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artnet Editors’ Picks: 17 Things Not to Miss in New York’s Art World This Week

Artnet Editors’ Picks: 17 Things Not To Miss In New York’s Art World This Week

Through Tuesday, November 6

Jorge Palacios, <em>Link</em> (2018). Photo by ImagenSubliminal (Miguel de Guzman + Rocio Romero), courtesy of the artist, ©The Isamu Noguchi Foundation and Garden Museum, NY, and Jorge Palacios.

Jorge Palacios, Link (2018). Photo by ImagenSubliminal (Miguel de Guzman + Rocio Romero), courtesy of the artist, ©The Isamu Noguchi Foundation and Garden Museum, NY, ARS, and Jorge Palacios.

1. “Jorge Palacios: Link” at Flatiron Plaza North

Jorge Palacios’s exhibition at the Noguchi Museum in Queens is on view through January 20, but this week is your last chance to catch his Accoya wood sculpture Link, on view opposite the Flatiron Building. Monumental in scale, the piece reflects the artist’s interest in how art can engage the public and the role it serves in civic life.

Location: Flatiron Plaza North, East 23rd Street and Fifth Avenue
Price: Free
Time: Open 24 hours

—Sarah Cascone

 

Through Wednesday, November 7

"Mira Nachman: STRIP" is on view at the MADE Hotel. Photo courtesy of the artist.

“Mira Nachman: STRIP” is on view at the MADE Hotel. Photo courtesy of the artist.

2. “Mira Nachman: STRIP” at MADE Hotel

Israeli photographer Mira Nachman’s sleek, fashionable photographs are inspired by the urban environs of New York and Tel Aviv but represent a journey of self-discovery. Nachman only embraced her passion for art after many successful years in corporate finance, a lucrative career that won her family’s approval but left a void waiting to be filled. She considers these photographs a symbol of her creative reawakening.

Location: MADE Hotel, 44 West 29th Street, lobby
Price: Free
Time: Open 24 hours

—Sarah Cascone

 

Wednesday, November 7

Curtis Talwst Santiago, Portrait of Malik in Venice (2018).

3. “Reclamation: Ruddy Roye & Curtis Talwst Santiago” at the Brooklyn Public Library

The Brooklyn Public Library is continuing its two-part exhibition “Reclamation” with new bodies of work from photographer Ruddy Roye and sculptor Curtis Talwst Santiago, kicking off the show with an artist talk this week.

Location: Brooklyn Public Library, 10 Grand Army Plaza
Price: Free
Time: Artist talk, 7 p.m.–9 p.m.

—Caroline Goldstein

 

Jane Dickson. Courtesy of Anthology Editions.

4. “Jane Dickson in Times Square” Book Launch & Film Screening at Red Bull Arts New York

To celebrate the release of artist Jane Dickson’s new book Jane Dickson in Times Square, the New York-based painter and author will be in conversation with art critic Linda Yablonsky and Charlie Ahearn, director of the seminal hip-hop and graffiti film Wild Style. The evening will also feature a screening of Ahearn’s Jane in Peepland (1993), and Ahearn’s Doin’ Time in Times Square (1991).

Location: Red Bull Arts New York, 220 West 18th Street
Price: Free
Time: 6:30 p.m.

—Caroline Goldstein

Through Saturday, November 10 

Alighiero Boetti,<em> Libri Rossi</em>. Photo courtesy of Valli Art Gallery.

Alighiero Boetti, Libri Rossi. Photo courtesy of Valli Art Gallery.

5. “Time by Boetti: Libri Rossi” at Valli Art Gallery

Between 1992 and 1994, Italian conceptual artist Alighiero Boetti made a collection of 15 books he titled Libri Rossi, collecting, ordering, and binding together photographs, drawings, press clippings, photocopies, and other ephemera. Valli Art Gallery presents the resulting bound red volumes, identified with gold numerals, allowing visitors to page through these carefully curated folios for a rare hands-on gallery experience.

Location: Valli Art Gallery, 507 West 27th Street
Price: Free
Time: Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Sebastião Salgado, <em>Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park, Utah and Arizona, USA</em> (2010). Photo courtesy of Sundaram Tagore Gallery.

Sebastião Salgado, Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park, Utah and Arizona, USA(2010). Photo courtesy of Sundaram Tagore Gallery.

6. “Sebastião Salgado: Landscapes, 2004–2018” at Sundaram Tagore Gallery

Catch three photographs from environmental Sebastião Salgado‘s new project, shot in Brazil’s Amazon jungle, currently threatened by mining, logging, and other human activity, in the artist’s current solo show at Sundaram Tagore Gallery. The exhibition also includes images from the artist’s well-known “Genesis” series, the subject of the Oscar-nominated 2014 film The Salt of the Earth.

Location: Sundaram Tagore Gallery, 547 West 27th Street
Price: Free
Time: Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Thursday, November 8–Sunday, November 11

Marek Emczek Olszewski, <em>14:14 London</em>. Photo courtesy of the Other Art Fair.

Marek Emczek Olszewski, 14:14 London. Photo courtesy of the Other Art Fair.

7. The Other Art Fair at Brooklyn Expo Center

Once upon a time, there was only one week a year you had to worry about art fairs in New York. Those days are gone. Adding to the busy circuit is Brooklyn’s the Other Art Fair, a UK import from Saatchi Art that touched down in New York in June 2017 and is somehow already debuting its fourth edition here in the city, featuring 130 independent and emerging artists selected by a committee of experts.

Location: Brooklyn Expo Center, 72 Noble Street, Brooklyn
Price: $8–30
Time: Friday, 12 p.m.–9 p.m.; Saturday, 11 a.m.–7 p.m.; Sunday, 11 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Thursday, November 8–Saturday, December 15

Ivan Forde, <em>Remember our Arrival</eM> (2017). Photo courtesy of the Baxter St. Camera Club of New York.

Ivan Forde, Remember our Arrival (2017). Photo courtesy of the Baxter St. Camera Club of New York.

8. “Ivan Forde: Dense Lightness” at the Baxter St. Camera Club of New York

Ivan Forde’s first solo show features his experimental work with cyanotypes, a cross-disciplinary approach that incorporates photographic performance, fabric, sound collage, sculpture, writing, and printmaking. The artist takes the ancient Mesopotamian poem The Epic of Gilgamesh as his point of inspiration, considering the tale from the point of view of Enkidu, Gilgamesh’s less-civilized rival-turned friend and companion.

Location: Baxter St. Camera Club, 126 Baxter Street
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; Tuesday–Saturday, 12 p.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Idele Weber, <em>Peach Slip</em> (1968). Courtesy Hollis Taggart.

Idele Weber, Peach Slip (1968). Courtesy Hollis Taggart.

9. “Idelle Weber: Postures and Profiles from the ’50s and ’60s” at Hollis Taggart

Idelle Weber, an under-appreciated mid-century woman artist, was a pioneer of the Pop art movement. Hollis Taggart, which has just begun representing the 86-year-old, presents a selection of over 30 works including Lucite cube sculptures, collages, and gouache and tempera on paper works.

Location: Hollis Taggart, 521 West 26th Street
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Thursday, November 8–Thursday, December 20

Nick Moss, <em>Poised</em> (2018). Courtesy of Leila Heller Gallery.

Nick Moss, Poised (2018). Courtesy of Leila Heller Gallery.

10. “Nick Moss: Rigorous Perception” at Leila Heller Gallery

Nick Moss uses industrial tools such as torches and welding guns to manipulate sheets of metal at temperatures as high as 36,000 degrees, creating stunning steel paintings. A master of material, Moss keeps his temperamental steel sheets from warping or wrinkling as he creates abstract compositions or powerful steel nudes.

Location: Leila Heller Gallery, 507 West 27th Street
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

 

Thursday, November 8–Saturday, December 22

Mandy El-Sayegh, 
White Grounds 10
 (2018). Courtesy of the artist and Lehmann Maupin.

11. “Mandy El-Sayegh: Mutations in Blue, White, and Red” at Lehmann Maupin

London-based artist Mandy El-Sayegh is making her US debut at Lehmann Maupin with a new suite of paintings, drawings, and sculptures that filter contemporary issues of society, culture, and the economy through the lens of various ephemera. Her use of mixed media and assemblage recall Rauschenberg’s combines, and her use of text from The Financial Times is reminiscent of Alexandra Bell’s edited front-page stories.

Location: Lehmann Maupin, 536 West 22nd Street
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Caroline Goldstein

Louise Bourgeois, Spiral (2009). Courtesy of Cheim & Read.

Louise Bourgeois, Spiral (2009). Courtesy of Cheim & Read, ©The Easton Foundation/VAGA at ARS, NY.

12. “Louise Bourgeois: Spiral” at Cheim & Read

It’s the end of an era at Cheim & Read, which will cease to have a traditional gallery space at the end of the year following the closing of “Louise Bourgeois: Spiral.” The exhibition will span the years 1950 to 2010, the year Bourgeois died, exploring her decades-long fascination with the spiral, a motif that reoccurred across the artist’s sculptures, paintings, and drawings, taking all sorts of forms.

Location: Cheim & Read, 547 West 25th Street
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

Friday, November 9–Friday, December 21

"Flash of the Spirit: Lyle Ashton Harris" at Salon 94. Photo courtesy of Salon 94.

“Flash of the Spirit: Lyle Ashton Harris” at Salon 94. Photo courtesy of Salon 94.

13. “Flash of the Spirit: Lyle Ashton Harris” at Salon 94

In his first show at Salon 94, Lyle Ashton Harris presents a new series of self-portraits shot amid bucolic landscapes, such as New York’s Hudson Valley and Fire Island. In each photograph, the artist dons a traditional African mask from the collection of his uncle, who acquired them during travels to West Africa in the 1960s. The vibrant images are dye-sublimation transfers printed large-scale on aluminum.

Location: Salon 94, 243 Bowery
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Sunday, November 11

Amar Kanwar, <em>Such a Morning</em> (2017). Video still courtesy of the artist and Marian Goodman Gallery

Amar Kanwar, Such a Morning (2017). Video still courtesy of the artist and Marian Goodman Gallery

14. Amar Kanwar’s Such a Morning at UnionDocs

The Vera List Center for Art and Politics and Marian Goodman Gallerypresent a screening of Indian artist and filmmaker Amar Kanwar’s Such a Morning, which explores themes of democracy, fascism, fear, and freedom. The evening serves as the opening event for the Vera List Center’s year-long series “Freedom of Speech: A Curriculum for Studies Into Darkness,” which continues the following evening with a free seminar titled “Mapping the Territory,” held at the New School’s Theresa Lang Community Center at 55 West 13th Street.

Location: UnionDocs, 322 Union Avenue, Brooklyn
Price: Free
Time: 6:30 p.m.–9:30 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Through Saturday, December 15

Tala Madani, <i>Untitled</i>, 2018. Image © Tala Madani and courtesy of 303 Gallery, New York.

Tala Madani, Untitled, 2018. Image © Tala Madani and courtesy of 303 Gallery, New York.

15. “Tala Madani” at 303 Gallery

For her first exhibition at 303 Gallery, Tala Madani continues her enduring exploration of humanity’s intertwined capacities for wonder and brutality. Adults and infants alternately take center stage in her series of new paintings (including two large corner canvases) and hand-painted, animated videos. Each work reminds viewers that even the most hallowed social norms cannot perfectly constrain our primal urges, regardless of whether those urges are innocent or malevolent.

Location: 303 Gallery, 555 West 21st Street
Price: Free
Time: Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Tim Schneider

 

Peter Halley, <i>Emulation</i>, 2002. Image courtesy of Sperone Westwater.

Peter Halley, Emulation, 2002.
Image courtesy of Sperone Westwater.

16. “Peter Halley: Unseen Paintings, 19972002, From the Collection of Gian Enzo Sperone” at Sperone Westwater

Peter Halley‘s latest exhibition at Sperone Westwater takes its title from a mystifying era between 1992 and 2002 in which the New York art world granted the artist only one exhibition. Drawn from the last half of that strangely under-recognized decade, the works on view here embody Halley’s unique painterly vocabulary: metallic and pearlescent paints locked into his signature “cell” and “conduit” forms, alluding to the city’s grid structure and the increasingly relentless flow of networked information promising (or perhaps threatening) to connect us all.

Location: Sperone Westwater, 257 Bowery
Price: Free
Time: Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Tim Schneider

 

Lorraine O'Grady, <em>Cutting Out CONYT 07</em> (1977/2017). Photo courtesy of Alexander Gray Associates.

Lorraine O’Grady, Cutting Out CONYT 07 (1977/2017). Photo courtesy of Alexander Gray Associates.

17. “Lorraine O’Grady: Cutting Out CONYT” at Alexander Gray Associates

In 1977, Lorraine O’Grady made 26 found newspaper poems from 26 straight Sunday issues of the New York Times. Over 40 years later, she’s revisited each work in the “Cutting Out the New York Times” series, cutting apart her collages and rearranging the words to create new “haiku diptychs.” O’Grady believes the new work, informed by decades of additional life experience, “embraces the mysterious intertwinings of narrative and politics, post-blackness and blackness in a way that ‘Cutting Out the New York Times’ could not accomplish or even imagine.”

Location: Alexander Gray Associates, 510 West 26th Street
Price: Free
Time: Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

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